• HI’s cut of $6B hemp crop needs non-paranoid governor, new State manager, smart advisers

    Every member of Hawaii’s 2019 Legislature – Democratic and Republican – voted to pass the industrial hemp bill. Governor Ige vetoed it, against the will of the people and lawmakers.  Senate Bill 1353 would have established a strong, thriving hemp program for Hawaii’s farmers– a $1 billion-a-year national industry that’s forecast to reach $6 billion in some three years. Following Federal law, the bill called for one yearly inspection of hemp crops, mirroring the policy of other mainland states.  Attempting to explain his veto, the politician claimed that since our ideal climate and soil can produce more than one crop yearly – a rare growing condition giving Hawaii the envied…

  • Open the renewable playing field

    Hawaii’s law protects the small, select group of current renewable energy devices including wind, solar and bioenergy. As time passes, newer renewable technologies move from their development phase to their commercial stage. Unfortunately, our state’s statutory provisions don’t protect open, feasible economic paths for these new devices. Wave energy, produced by Wave Energy Converters (WEC), top the list of devices needing updated statutory recognition and assistance. Our own Kaneohe Bay houses the Navy’s Wave Energy Testing Site, where cutting-edge experiments use ocean waves to generate electricity. Multiple prototypes that originate from around the world and that capture mechanical energy from waves are continuously tested and tweaked here. As these advancements…